Our History

The Early Days:

The foundation stone of Holy Trinity Church was laid on All Saints' Eve, 31st October, 1899, by the Bishop of Chichester, and this must have been a great occasion for the people of the growing district of the town known as "The Common" who witnessed the foundation of the building of the church for which so many had worked since the project had first been discussed in November, 1896. The church was consecrated by Bishop Wilberforce on 18th December, 1900, thus began the spiritual life in Holy Trinity Church as we know it today.

Until quite recently the western aspect of the church was almost entirely obscured by a pair of mighty elm trees. Regrettably, these trees became the victims of Dutch Elm disease and had to be cut down. However, there is some compensation. The visitor today is enabled to view the western aspect of the church much as Mr. Gilbee Scott the architect must have visualised it.


The Church Interior and its Contents:

The main body of the church is constructed of a warm red brick, and is entered by twin west doors from the foyer, or from the new porch built in 1997/8. The nave below a lofty beamed roofing appears spacious, with a wide central aisle leading to the chancel steps. On the wall intersecting the two west doors, three plaques give information about the stations of the cross, the doors and the bell.

 

 

Particularly to be noted are the stations of the cross around the north, west and south walls, beautifully carved in oak by John Hough of Dublin. The bell was given in memory of Margaret Collett Webb (1857-1934). The west doors were dedicated to the memory of Flora Tyrell Robertson (1889-1971) and Alice Mabel Madgwick (1887-1975).

 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

In the south wall are twin stained glass windows depicting the Incarnation and Christ appearing to Mary Magdalene after the resurrection. Located in the church porch is a glass-topped cabinet containing a Book of Remembrance, which records the names of those whose ashes are buried in the Garden of Rest, or in whose memory gifts have been given to the church.

Arcades divide the nave from the north and south aisles. Formed by Gothic arches, each of two lengths, they are supported by single pillars. Against the pillar supporting the arcade north, and at eye level, is a handsome statue of the Virgin holding the infant Christ, carved in Austria from sweet chestnut wood; an interesting feature is that the Child is depicted holding a butterfly in his hands. In the north wall are two memorial tablets to the dead of two world wars, and overlooking the Lady Chapel in the north aisle are two etched windows depicting St. John the Divine and St. Basil the Great. Placed near the wall in the north aisle is an oak chest thought to be from the seventeenth century.

 
 
 
 
The font standing at the west end of the nave is simple in design and carved from local stone.
 

 

  

 

 

The chancel arch in the Gothic style is wide and handsome without decoration. There is no screen as such, and from the body of the church or at the chancel steps, the sanctuary may be viewed as a whole. The central panel of the east window shows Christ the King enthroned in glory above the Archangel Michael, who is surrounded by ten winged cherubs' heads.

  

In the north wall of the sanctuary is a stained glass window to the memory of those men in the surrounding district who lost their lives in the first World War.  An aumbry in which the blessed sacrament is reserved is set in the north wall of the sanctuary.

The oak choir stalls and the carved pulpit were made by local craftsmen in 1900. The present pews came from St. John's Church at Broadbridge Heath when the old church was replaced, and the churchwardens' staves and silver mounts were made by the Warham Guild of Oxford.

 


The Organ:

The organ was built and installed by Henry Willis II of Henry Willis & Sons of Petersfield, Hampshire, in 1903. It has been well cared-for over the years, with an overhaul in 1963. In 1997 it became clear that a full restoration was required, and English Heritage made a sizeable grant towards the cost, and the work was completed in 2001. The organ is an asset to the church, and many musicians have played on it.

 

 

The Garden of Rest: 
 
 
Entry to the garden is either by a gate or through the foyer, bringing one out to the south side of the church. Furnished with bench seats, it forms a quiet place of retreat and meditation. The cremated remains of past members of the church are buried in a tiled area of the garden. 
 
 
 
 

The New Entrance:

Apart from the works outlined in our history above, and three or four successive upgradings and improvements in the heating and lighting installations over the life of the church, the next major project, in 1997, was the addition of a spacious gabled porch with ramped access for wheelchair users and others. The architect was so successful in matching the materials and style of the porch to those of the original building, that the result was widely acclaimed and an award made by the Horsham District Council. In 2001/2 the original roof and dormer windows were replaced.
 

 The Holy Trinity Banner - Dedicated on Trinity Sunday 2009:

The Design shows the Holy Trinity over Horsham. God the Creator is robed in green and the Holy Spirit is represented by the Dove. All the figures are surrounded by a rainbow of glory, while the sun and moon hang in the azure of space. Beneath lies Horsham, depicted by representative landmarks of the Horsham and Trinity area.
 
The designer is Michael Coles, NDD, ARCA, an acknowledged authority on stained glass and artist in the design of contemporary  works of art for churches.
 
The banner commemorates Cicely Snelling (1904—2001), the daughter of John Gumbrill (1870—1940), who as a stonemason helped build the church 1899—1901. Cicely and her husband Harold (1905—1975) were both baptized at Holy Trinity.
 

 The History Within The History:

The history of Holy Trinity Church is inevitably linked to the things that we can see and touch. The present building itself, now over one hundred years old, and all the things of beauty and ornament that it contains are firmly rooted in space and time. But there is, of course, another inner history which is more subtle and difficult to chart. It is the history of worship, of practice and attitude, the story of how the priests and people of Holy Trinity have seen the demands of Christian living and worship, and how, over the years, they have reacted to them.
 
 
 

   TheTh

The history of Holy Trinity Church is inevitably linked to the things that we can see and touch. The present building itself, now over one hundred years old, and all the things of beauty and ornament that it contains are firmly rooted in space and time. But there is, of course, another inner history which is more subtle and difficult to chart. It is the history of worship, of practice and attitude, the story of how the priests and people of Holy Trinity have seen the demands of Christian living and worship, and how, over the years, they have reacted to them.
 

 

The History Within The History
 

The History Within The His
The history of Holy Trinity Church is inevitably linked to the things that we can see and touch. The present building itself, now over one hundred years old, and all the things of beauty and ornament that it contains are firmly rooted in space and time. But there is, of course, another inner history which is more subtle and difficult to chart. It is the history of worship, of practice and attitude, the story of how the priests and people of Holy Trinity have seen the demands of Christian living and worship, and how, ov